Elaine Chittenden examining a leaf from the Smith Collections.

Elaine Chittenden examining a leaf from the Smith Collections.

Elaine Chittenden,  Manager of Living Collections at The Botanic Garden of Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts will be giving a slide presentation of her favorite hardy plants, many of which are woodies and many of which are in the Smith Collection, discussing why she holds them in high regard. There will be time at the end to discuss some of the reference materials that she uses in her work at Smith when researching the cultural needs of new acquisitions (e.g., Dirr, Phillip & Rix, Flora of Japan, etc.).

 

Elaine Chittenden hoisting a winning azalea as she judges the Rhododendron Society of Connecticut Truss Show this past spring.

Elaine Chittenden hoisting a winning azalea as she judges the Rhododendron Society of Connecticut Truss Show this past spring.

Elaine received her BS Cum Laude in Soil Science and Agronomy from the University of Connecticut, and a Masters in Botany/Plant Biology from Michigan State University. She has worked as Botanist/Volunteer Coordinator for The Nature Conservancy, Collections Manager at MSU, and is currently Manager of Living Collections at The Botanic Garden of Smith College.

Join us this Wednesday night at 7pm in the Solomon Welles House @ 220 Hartford Avenue in Wethersfield, Connecticut. Elaine will surprise us with her favorite hardy plants, delight us with pictures and share information she has discovered over many years of horticultural experience…

 

 

 

 

 

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At Smith College she works to manage the following in “Special Collections”:

***1200 types of woody trees and shrubs

Smith College camperdown elm viewpoint of the pond on campus.

Smith College camperdown elm viewpoint of the pond on campus.

Trudy's Garden

Trudy’s Garden

***2200 types of hardy herbaceous plants

Trillium cernum a delightful native spring ephemeral...

Trillium cernum a delightful native spring ephemeral…

Opuntua macrorhiza

Opuntua macrorhiza

***3200 types of tender herbaceous and woody plants in the Lyman Conservatory.

So she has to choose from approximately 6000 different kinds of plants, with altogether approximately 8,850 total on campus to put together her favorites!!!

 

View of the Lyman Conservatory across the Systematics Garden.

View of the Lyman Conservatory across the Systematics Garden.

 

The Gardens include:

Outdoor Gardens

  1. Gardens Map
  2. Capen Garden
  3. Happy Chace ’28 Garden
  4. Woodland and Wildflower Garden
  5. Systematics Garden of Smith College

    Systematics Garden of Smith College

    Mary Maples Dunn Garden

  6. Systematics Garden
  7. Rock Garden
  8. Perennial Border
  9. Xerophyte Garden
  10. Trudy’s Garden
  11. Wilson Bulb Bank
  12. Science Center Rock Park

Begin on Page 8 of the Spring 2006 Botanic Garden Newsletter to read an article Elaine wrote:

What’s in a Name?

Is that Calycanthus, Sinocalycanthus, or Sinocalycalycanthus?

The New and Improved Sweetshrubs

by Elaine Chittenden

An interspecific (between two different species), hybrid with the name of Calycanthus × raulstonii ‘Hartlage Wine'

An interspecific (between two different species), hybrid with the name of Calycanthus × raulstonii ‘Hartlage Wine’

an excerpt: “Name changes may be based on different interpretations of the same data or the results of new research. In the case of Sinocalycanthus, it is new molecular research data that would indicate that Sinocalycanthus and ×Sinocalycalycanthus can all be lumped together in the genus Calycanthus. However, the name Sinocalycanthus is well established in both the botanical and horticultural literature. So if you are looking for the new and improved sweetshrubs, you may find them under either name. Here at the (Smith) Botanic Garden we’ve decided to label the Chinese wax shrub Calycanthus chinensis. To complicate matters, any name change would impact ×Sinocalycalycanthus raulstonii ‘Hartlage Wine,’ which would no longer be an intergeneric hybrid but rather an interspecific (between two different species), hybrid with the name of Calycanthus × raulstonii ‘Hartlage Wine.’” Elaine Chittenden, The Botanic Garden of Smith College, Botanic Garden News, Spring 2006, pp. 8-9,