Figure 2. Similar and identical species found in eastern Asia and eastern North America suggest that these two regions were once part of one continuous plant and animal distribution.

Figure 1. Similar and identical species found in eastern Asia and eastern North America suggest that these two regions were once part of one continuous plant and animal distribution.

Figure 1. There are many similarities between the wildlife of eastern Asia and eastern North America

Figure 2. There are many similarities between the wildlife & plantlife of eastern Asia and eastern North America

The eastern Asian – eastern North American floristic disjunction is a curious phenomenon that has fascinated botanists for over 250 years: the existence of an entire catalog of plant genera shared by these vastly separated regions but found nowhere else in the world. It has inspired generations of researchers and given impetus to such fields as biogeography and paleobotany.

 

 

 

 

Rose Pagonia -- Pagonia ophioglossoides

 

The feature photo shows Pogonia ophioglossoides which is one such plant.

Rose Pogonia is native to bogs in much of Eastern North America.  Pogonia japonica (formerly known as Pogonia ophioglossoides var. japonica) is a very similar looking species native to Japan & parts of China

 

 

 

 

Charles Darwin

Charles Darwin

Scientists now recognize many different disjunct patterns around the world, but the eastern Asian – eastern North American pattern was the first to be discovered, and remains the classic disjunction.

How did it come to be?  Learn how Charles Darwin & Asa Gray discussed this at length & Asa presented the theory to his North American colleagues.

Asa Gray

Asa Gray

Campis radicans American Trumpet Creeper

Campis radicans American Trumpet Creeper

What are the plants involved?  David will show us pictures and explain the relationships of Asian & American Genera & species.  One such is our native Trumpet Creeper…  We’ll look at beautiful woody and herbaceous plants from both sides of the disjunction.  David’s Arnoldia article on Land Bridge Travelers (linked below) will prepare you for his presentation Wednesday, January 27th, 2016.

Campis grandiflora Chinese Trumpet Creeper

Campis grandiflora Chinese Trumpet Creeper

We meet at the Solomon Welles House at 220 Hartford Avenue in Wethersfield Connecticut.   7pm we gather for refreshments and catching up with each other & our horticultural endeavors.  @ 7:30 we have a short meeting, announce future meetings and events, have a plant & horticultural items raffle &/or auction.  Our speaker generally begins by 7:45 with wrap-up at 9pm or so….   Please join us.

David Yih is an amateur botanist and vice president of the Connecticut Botanical Society.

David Yih Connecticut Botanical Society Vice President

David Yih CBS Vice President

He writes about plants, natural history, and history of botany for publications such as Arnoldia, the magazine of Harvard University’s Arnold Arboretum.

1) Chimonanthus praecox: A Redolence of China

2) Mark Catesby: Pioneering Naturalist, Artist, and Horticulturist

3) 2012 article by David Yih: Land Bridge Travelers of the Tertiary: The Eastern
Asian–Eastern North American Floristic Disjunction published in Arnoldia, Harvard

Currently, he is writing a book about rust fungi and the story of white pine blister rust. White pine blister rust

As an aside…  David is a musician also…  David Yih Conjunto Antillano